Gosset Extra Brut Champagne
  • Gosset Extra Brut Champagne

Gosset Extra Brut Champagne

€30.75
BCC-301

It is an extra-brut champagne made from blends made up of 40% Pinot Noir grape, 32% Pinot Meunier grape and 28% Chardonnay grape.

The color is pale and luminous gold.

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Evaluation des critiques Moyenne : star_rate star_rate star_rate star_rate star_rate 4.2/5 (7 avis)
Parker 89/100
Wine Spectator 90/100
Jancis Robinson 16.5/20
Bettane & Desseauve 16/20
Revue du Vin de France 16/20
Gault & Millau 16/20
Richard Juhlin 92/100

It is an extra-brut champagne made from blends made up of 40% Pinot Noir grape, 32% Pinot Meunier grape and 28% Chardonnay grape.

The color is pale and luminous gold.

On the nose and on the palate: white flowers such as hawthorn or acacia with gourmet notes of pear, vine peach, mirabelle plum and claude. Aging for a minimum of 4 years in the cellar reveals its great aromatic complexity. This champagne of great purity retains liveliness and freshness to balance its gourmet vinosity on the palate.

Food / wine pairing: this is the champagne par excellence for aperitifs and moments to be remembered whatever the occasion. The Gosset Extra-Brut cuvée will go perfectly with small raw vegetables, fresh shrimps or even savory biscuits.

Data sheet

Appellations :
Champagne
Terroirs :
Montagne de Reims - Côte des blancs - Vallée de la Marne
Classification :
Premier & Grand Cru
Grape varieties :
28% Chardonnay, 40% Pinot Noir, 32% Pinot Meunier
Color :
White (color)
Vintage :
Non-Millésimé
Quality :
Extra Brut
Format :
750ml
Packaging :
Case
Température de service :
8 - 10%
Brand Gosset :

In 1584, Pierre Gosset, who was then Alderman of Aÿ and winemaker, produced still wines, often red, with the harvest of his own vines in Aÿ. It is for this reason that this House is the oldest Champagne House.

At that time, the wines of A like the wines of Burgundy fought for the place at the table of the Kings of France. Both were made from Pinot Noir and Chardonnay.

Later, in the 18th century, only Aÿ wine, called Champagne at the end of the 19th century, became effervescent.